Thursday, June 15, 2017

Godmorgon to you, and Odensvik!



I'm hoping that all my blog followers and vlog subscribers are suitably impressed.

If you haven't noticed, I'll blow my own horn with impunity and a total complete lack of humility.

It's another episode of the vlog, and it's landing in your inboxes within something crazy like 48 hours of the previous episode. Believe me when I say that, even a month ago, I would have said that was a shear impossibility.

What changed?

Well, like anything else, it's possible to get to a point where producing a half-decent YouTube video becomes a little more routine, and a little less of an unaccompanied hike in a steamy wild jungle. That's because you begin to learn where the path lies among the myriad complex and bewildering choices you are faced with when you open a powerful video editing suite on your computer.

This episode was prompted by one of the basic things that motivated me to begin blogging in the first place.

You have the need to get something accomplished, like in this case installing an Ikea Godmorgon - Odensvik - Rinnen floating bathroom vanity.

In short order you hit a foggy wall in the plumbing section at your local Rona, Lowes and Home Depot stores, and you don't get any further at a couple of professional plumbing supply houses, and in spite of having Googled and YouTubed for hours, you are still scratching your head stymied in your attempts to solve what ought to be a very, very, very simple task: hooking up the Ikea Rinnen drain system to the drain rough-in that pokes out of your bathroom wall.

Eventually I figured it out, and quite elegantly I have to say, speaking as a non-plumber. More elegantly than some of the examples I found in my online searches, here, and here, here, here and here.

Once all the running around and cursing is done and the job is a success, I for one react this way: "Holy crap, if only I had come across a video like the one I'm going to make explaining how to get from Eh!?! to beeee-you-tiful!"

So there you have it. Another public service like some of the other examples you can find right here in the Gear Guide, and the Touring Guide. Only it has absolutely nothing to do with riding a motorbike. It's about life. Life on two wheels.

My work here is done!

You're welcome!

And now the credits:

The music for this episode is Tribal Song by Silent Partner, a royalty-free selection from the YouTube Audio Library: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music

The vanity is from the ingenious folks at Ikea.

The blood, sweat, and tears are all my own.



6 comments:

  1. Why would the stub out for the drain be made of copper?

    Nice video

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it's because our townhouse is part of a high rise condominium project and the building code may require all metal plumbing. There's no plastic anywhere, PVC, ABS or otherwise.

      Delete
  2. Well done, David. In Germany we grow up with Ikea and learn the how-to installation (and how to deal with subsequent frustration) at a very early age. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't grow up with Ikea, but our kids certainly did.

      Their products have good design and very high engineering and quality control standards. It amazes me that you get precisely the right number and kind of fasteners and that the fit and finish is so precise.

      And to think that Ikea made a successful worldwide business out of forest industry waste: sawdust!

      Delete
  3. David, I was very surprised at the copper drain as well.

    Your professional plumber wasn't impressed with your engineering tools but I certainly was. Nice going! Great video and great job, your persistence was obviously very well rewarded.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The fact that none of the hardware stores stocked copper drain materials, except for tail pieces and J-bends, none of which would mate withe copper drain, made this an infuriating challenge.

      All's well that ends well. Maybe my video will help someone else in the same boat.

      Delete

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