Thursday, August 29, 2013

Foggy morning

I love fog.

I love riding.

You'd think riding to work on a foggy morning would be a treat.

Well, yes, and no.

The problem is my visor. The heavier the fog, the harder it is to see because the mist covers my visor. Lifting the visor doesn't help because then my glasses get covered.  Riding without my glasses would be better, but not smart, or safe.  Contact lenses would probably do the trick.

It's a shame, because I love fog.  And I love riding.

Yesterday's fog was on the light side. A compromise fog, if you will.  Not quite heavy enough to delightfully transform the landscape, but not enough to make riding and seeing particularly difficult.

Looking for a decent photo on the grounds at Stewart Hall, I found a scene I had shared here in the past...
... and an unexpected one...
I also love totem poles.  Normally you have to be on the left coast to see them.  There was no time to learn about these.  There is an explanation on the city's web site.  The information looks like ephemera, so I preserved it here.

14 comments:

  1. David:

    If I had to choose between fog or rain, it would be fog. But if I had to choose between sunshine or fog, then I would have to think about it . . .

    bob
    Riding the Wet Coast

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    1. Bob, that's only because sunshine is sometimes as rare on the wet coast as fog is here and elsewhere.

      Here the choice is a no-brainer: go for fog every time.

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  2. I must admit that I like light fog. The heavy, dense fog with visibility in the tens of feet is too dangerous. The totem pole do seem out of place but probably a gift from some other city...

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    1. Richard, fog does really cool things to sounds, not just sights. Last week we were in Halifax and woke one morning to pretty dense fog. The fog horns sounding in the harbour and out in the distance were an interesting thing to wake to.

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  3. I have to admit I like the eerie mood the fog gives to the landscape too.

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    1. Karen, eerie, yet calm and soothing too. It's as if the fog insulates from the daily reality by cloaking the familiar things and giving them an entirely different personality.

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  4. I'm on board with the fog. It almost never gets thick enough around here to stop movement...in the daylight.

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    1. Coop, I can count on the fingers of one hand the times when fog made driving a challenge. Mostly it's just a welcome change to the familiar landscape.

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  5. I too love the fog, but only during daylight hours. Riding (or driving) in fog at night is just too headache-inducing for me.

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    1. Dave, the worst thing are banks of fog in a low spot on the highway that spring up on you. There is a section of highway on the south shore here that has seen some really big pile-ups. There is also a stretch of the 401 between London and Toronto that is similarly dangerous.

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  6. I am with you on the fog, and yep it also fogs up the visor. That's a serious downer. Sometimes I just walk through fog if riding is too dangerous. The eery atmosphere intrigues me. These totem poles make for a really nice contrast in the mist.

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    1. Sonja, I only have my iPhone and Camera+ to work with, but they can be coaxed into doing a decent job.

      I couldn't get the totem colours to pop quite as much as they seemed to when I was looking at them.

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  7. A nice bright spot of color on a foggy morning. Lovely.

    I don't mind the fog as long s it isn't on my visor. I find myself looking forward to fall and winter this year and the cooler weather.

    I am with Sonja - I love the eery atmosphere of fog. Driving through low lying fog whisping above the road in the dark is eery too. Like you are driving through souls. Freaky.

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  8. Brandy, you get the literary prize of the month for coming up with "Like you are driving through souls."

    I don't what others may think, but that is just great as far as I am concerned.

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The copyright in all text and photographs, except as noted, belongs to David Masse.